The Scott 222C Restoration, Part 1

I bought it in early 2010 described as a fixer-upper, with no photos, and a low price. I was egged on by those more knowledgeable than I, and I’m not one to turn down a challenge.

 

Bought based on this image.

Bought based on this image.

 

Plus, it was my birthday.

The seller sent me two iPhone photos of a dirty, tubeless Scott 222C and I sent him my money. Here’s what found its way to me, in a padded box, suspended in a two-cubic-foot box:

 

Arrived A-OK!

Arrived A-OK!

 

Looking it over, the faceplate was dusty and dirty, the chassis was pitted, the transformers were rusty, the controls were stiff, but it was straight, and it came with a wood case. It was exactly what I wanted, and more than I could have imagined.

First things first! I had some 9-pin sockets that I bought at the surplus-price of 20/$1; I wanted to compare if they would work in the event that I needed to replace any of the stock sockets (spoiler: I didn’t, but here’s a pretty photo)

 

Old v. New

Old v. New

 

You can see the pitting in the aluminum as well as some green buildup on the transformer screws and a white buildup on the transformer laminations. I didn’t get any of the four tube shields that the preamplifier section came with when it was originally sold.

Next step? I removed the faceplate and gave it a gentle polish with a Magic Eraser:

 

Faceplate

Dirty v. Clean

 

Turned out nicely! There’s some deeper scratches here and there–primarily around headphone jack–but I’m happy with it! Next step was to clean up the chassis, and to make it easier, everything had to be stripped from the top.

 

I started taking a lot of underneath photos at this point

I started taking a lot of underneath photos at this point

No turning back now!

No turning back now!

 

Ultimately the pitting wouldn’t allow me to get a mirror finish, so I decided to give the main chassis a swirl finish. I got out my rotary tool and a Workmate and set-out to clean it up.

 

Got everything together

Got everything together

Before

Before

After

After

 

With the chassis taken care of, I turned my eye to the transformers. First I pulled the end bells off, stripped everything down, painted with a high-heat enamel, cleaned the screws up, and reassembled them:

 

Stripped End Bells

Stripped end bells

Baking the Enamel

Baking the enamel

Cooked End Bell

Cooked end bell

How to Clean the Screws

How to clean the screws

Comparison of Screws

Comparison of screws

Cleaned Screws

Cleaned screws

Done Transformers

Done transformers

 

I did a test-fit to see how everything looked:

 

Looking Good!

Looking good!

 

The keen observer will notice that there are two new capacitors mounted up top. I had to drill + rivet the clamps for the new caps before I put the power transformer back in place and I actually started working on the electronics before I cleaned up the transformers, but I’ll touch on that in my next post.

The physical appearance is done and that’s all for now!

 

 

P.